BOOK FOR SALE Essential Oil Safety

Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals 2nd Edition by Robert Tisserand (Author),? Rodney Young (Author)

“The only comprehensive text on the safety of essential oils. The first review of essential oil/drug interactions. Detailed essential oil constituent data not found in any other text. Essential oil safety guidelines. 400 essential oil profiles.” — Elsevier

 

FOR SALE AUCTION ON EBAY – Starting Bid $65

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Essential-Oil-Safety-A-Guide-for-Health-Care-Professionals-by-Tony-Balacs/222844934272

New Aromatherapy Company Launch – Ology Essentials

From the new website for Ology Essentials

There is a great depth of knowledge, training, and commitment behind Ology Essentials. You can trust Ology Essentials for accurate, scientific, and honest no-hype information about essential oils, business, and natural cosmetics. The founder of Ology Essentials is certified aromatherapist and cosmetic formulator Kayla Fioravanti. She has been a trusted disseminator of knowledge and provider of high quality products since she and her husband first co-founded Essential Wholesale in 1998.

I have known and admired owner Kayla Fioravanti since I first started in the soap and aromatherapy industry myself many years ago and her articles, posts on social networking and knowledge she so freely shared through Essential Wholesale are very much a foundation of my own knowledge base.  I am thrilled she is back in this industry again and highly recommend her company as a source of products and her school as a great place to learn about safe essential oil use an aromatherapy.  She represents what ethics in aromatherapy looks like on every level!


NOTE: I did not receive any products at a discount or free in exchange for my review, nor have I been compensated in any way. I am just a fan! I have no material affiliation with the websites in this blog post.

MLMs – A Public Health Hazard

I wish everyone would listen to this exceptional short lecture by David Crow!

Learn more about David Crow here: http://www.floracopeia.com/David-Crow/


NOTE: I did not receive any products at a discount or free in exchange for my review, nor have I been compensated in any way. I am just a fan! I have no material affiliation with any of the websites in this blog post.

Common Sense

It recently came to my attention that the owners (their term) of the “movie” Uncommon Scents have been advertising and promoting a doTerra essential oil collection (valued by the company) as being worth over $500, as part of their fundraising *crowdfunding* efforts to finish their project.  A lot of people objected to this affiliation and the movie producers turning what appears to be a blind eye to all the harm and injuries this company has been responsible for, in their pursuit of money to fund the “finishing” of their film/video project.

Here is one of many reasons I am opposed to any promotion of this company; back in 2013 I wrote the following article:

Essential Oil “Expert” risks lives!

As a follow-up to my report to the FDA, I made a call to the  Nevada State Board of Medical Examiners.

While I certainly care about the future of Aromatherapy in this country, I also care very deeply about innocent people being led to believe essential oils can cure their medical problems.

Here is just one example; this doTerra Multi-Level-Marketing Salesperson is actually prescribing an essential oil for the serious, life threatening illness – hemophilia…which equals practicing medicine without a license!

Some information about hemophilia from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]:
“Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder in which the blood does not clot properly. This can lead to spontaneous bleeding as well as bleeding following injuries or surgery.” http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemophilia/facts.html

“Mortality rates and hospitalization rates for bleeding complications from hemophilia were 40% lower among people who received care in hemophilia treatment centers than among those who did not receive this care.” http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemophilia/data.html

“Death can occur if the bleeding cannot be stopped or if it occurs in a vital organ such as the brain.”

And how does self-identified “Essential Oil Expert” answer the following question from a Mother on Facebook?

Evie asks “what oil would you suggest for someone who’s son is a hemophiliac? Would Helichrysum stop the bleeding?

She tells the Mother “Evie, Helichrysum will definitely help stop the bleeding

Does she care that her medical advice could kill someone or cause permanent harm? Does she care that in fact, every oil that has ever been tested is, if anything, either inactive or blood-thinning and  yet she is advising someone to use this EO for this condition which could KILL A CHILD?

Nope…all she cares about is making money selling essential oils to unsuspecting customers.

After all…she calls herself an Expert!  Is she a Certified Aromatherapist?  No.

We know she is not a doctor – perhaps a nurse or a licensed massage therapist? Nope…she is nothing – and has no actual professional education in the field of aromatherapy or health care at all.

But she thinks adding the standard doTerra company Disclaimer means she can say and do whatever she wants and it is up to the public to dig around her website and discover…too bad if you get hurt…you are on your own: “I am not a licensed physician and can’t diagnose or prescribe medications for you.  This disclaimer acts as the explicit waiver of any liability of myself as an Independent Product Consultant or doTERRA as a company.”

So…if she can’t prescribe medications by law – why is her Facebook page under the category “Health/Medical/Pharmaceuticals” …because she wants her customers to THINK she CAN prescribe Essential Oils to cure their Medical problems…that’s why!

Use some Common Sense Uncommon Scents:

Bad Company Corrupts Good Character

and

You Lie Down with Dogs, You Get Up with Fleas!

Sensitization Update

Robert Tisserand announced today “Do not apply undiluted essential oils to your skin. It’s that simple.

“I have recently changed my stance on this after seeing the number of people experiencing adverse reactions to essential oils that are not high risk, such as frankincense, helichrysum and lavender.”

This announcement is tied into his new Tisserand Institute Safety Pages.

This is a long time coming.  Robert has always allowed for a certain amount of neat usage as low risk in the past (see quote below). So better late than never.  Because Sensitization is forever.

The National Association of Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) used to promote safety and warn about sensitization on their old website, under more safety-minded management.  Here is a link to my Lost and Found: Sensitization article on that subject.

Here is some additional information from an old article I wrote for the (defunct) American Essential Oil Trade Association (aka AEOTA):

Sensitization “exposure to allergen that results in the development of hypersensitivity.” [1]

essential oil poured on a female back in spa centre
essential oil poured on a female back in spa centre

So what is hypersensitivity? Is a hypersensitivity reaction the same as an allergic reaction?

Answer, yes. They are synonyms, BUT there are four different types of allergic reaction:

“a local or general reaction of an organism following contact with a specific allergen to which it has been previously exposed and sensitized; immunologic mechanisms gives rise to inflammation or tissue damage. Allergic reactions are classified into four major types: type I, anaphylactic and IgE dependent; type II, cytotoxic; type III, immune-complex mediated;type IV, cell mediated (delayed).”[2]

For the purposes of aromatherapy safety, any essential oil can become an allergen by using it undiluted on the skin; and this risk is there for all essential oils, including lavender (note – originally published in 2014).

So while there are certain essential oils which have a known reputation for being potential allergens or with a reputation for sensitization, using any essential oil neat (undiluted) sets the individul up for a potential allergic reaction, leading to sensitization, and forever being allergic to that essential oil.

Robert Tisserand explains:

“Yes, sensitization is the process that takes place in the body that leads to an allergic reaction. They are not the same thing, but they are not totally different either. There are 4 types of allergic reaction, [3] but only two are relevant to essential oils. Type 4 (delayed hypersensitivity) accounts for 90% of allergic reactions. Type 1 is immediate hypersensitivity (generally not anaphylactic) and accounts for the other 10%. You could say the risk is potentially there for all essential oils, but this is a little unfair on the majority of oils, that have never been known to cause such reactions. I don’t like to assume risk that may not exist. The less you dilute the more you increase risk, but that doesn’t mean that undiluted copaiba oil is a greater risk than 1% cinnamon bark oil. It isn’t.”

1. Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved
2. Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
3. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/136217-overview

Structure Function Claims

Originally published July 2, 2015

What follows in part, are the Young Living tips for using structure-function claims appropriately. The yellow highlights are my editorial emphasis. I have nothing much to add here other than a comment that since there is no legitimate scientific proof supporting the daily ingestion of lemon essential oil for ANY purpose, the industry should start to see that dangerous advice fade away if salespeople follow these tips.

The FDA does not allow any structure-function claims for products unless those products are sold under the FDA DSHEA food labeling laws, and labeled as dietary supplements.

So the same essential oil can be in two bottles, sold side by side, one labeled as a Dietary Supplement with instructions for ingestion and claims the essential oil will impact the structure or function of the body, and as long as there is science to support that claim – it is legal.

The same essential oil – even with an equal or greater body of science, or supported by historic use within the field of aromatherapy or herbal medicine – cannot be sold with the same claims, if the bottle is not marketed as a dietary supplement. And considering that ingestion is the more hazardous application in most cases, and should really only be undertaken under the direct supervision of someone trained in aromatic medicine – the FDA regulations do not make much sense. But, they are what they are and until they are changed, companies are required to follow them.

Claims that essential oils will treat, cure or prevent illness is illegal for essential oils whether the product is sold as a dietary supplement or not. Examples of medical conditions include colds, flu, acne, rash, insomnia, obesity, and pain.

S-F_claim